Spirituality: Defined

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-by Matt Leedham

You will find no definition of spirituality here.

I’m sorry, I didn’t mean to deceive you, but I’ve come to realize that spirituality is a very personal journey. It would be impossible to simply provide you with a definition.

Instead, perhaps I can at least give you the gift of awareness, if only for a brief moment. As comfortable or uncomfortable as you are with the concept of spirituality, take a moment to stop what you are doing and reflect on what spirituality means to you.

Need help? Here are some questions to consider:

  • Does spirituality have to do with your beliefs you have about your soul?
  • Or does the definition lie in who you are?
  • Does it have to do with your core values?
  • Does it have to do with your relationship with God?
  • Or your relationship with others?
  • Does it have to do with energy?
  • Is it about connection, or love, or expression?
  • Does it have to do with the universe?

Have you simply never considered it before?

Those that specialize in health and wellness have identified 4 core areas of well-being: Spiritual, Emotional, Mental, and Physical. How would you rate your satisfaction or fulfillment in these areas?

I’m full of more questions than answers today, I’m afraid.

I’d be very curious to hear your thoughts on the matter. Please share a comment below.

8 thoughts on “Spirituality: Defined

  1. Have you ever heard of the concept of a "parish nurse"? My Mom worked as one for 10 years and it fits in with the theme of your post today. She was an ER nurse in an inner city hospital for 20 years, then got burned out. She really feels that you can't just "greet them, treat them, and street them" like most hospitals do today. Her theory is that to be a "Well" person you must be physically, mentally and spiritually well. All three aspects need to be in balance. She worked as a parish nurse at a large church where she was part counselor, part patient advocate, part health educator for the people in the congregation. It is a really interesting aspect of public health that is not addressed much.
    -MM

  2. Have you ever heard of the concept of a "parish nurse"? My Mom worked as one for 10 years and it fits in with the theme of your post today. She was an ER nurse in an inner city hospital for 20 years, then got burned out. She really feels that you can't just "greet them, treat them, and street them" like most hospitals do today. Her theory is that to be a "Well" person you must be physically, mentally and spiritually well. All three aspects need to be in balance. She worked as a parish nurse at a large church where she was part counselor, part patient advocate, part health educator for the people in the congregation. It is a really interesting aspect of public health that is not addressed much.
    -MM

  3. Thanks for sharing, Megan. That's really interesting. I have not heard of a "parish nurse" before but the concept is very intriguing. I wonder how common that is. I wonder how your mom slipped into this unique role. Is it something she created for herself, or was the need so obvious that the church requested these types of services. Either way, it sounds like a great way to use your unique gifts and talents to positively impact peoples' lives.

  4. Thanks for sharing, Megan. That's really interesting. I have not heard of a "parish nurse" before but the concept is very intriguing. I wonder how common that is. I wonder how your mom slipped into this unique role. Is it something she created for herself, or was the need so obvious that the church requested these types of services. Either way, it sounds like a great way to use your unique gifts and talents to positively impact peoples' lives.

  5. I've always considered myself as a very spiritual person but not a religious person. I've practiced different types of Yoga over several decades; learned the Silva Method of Mind Control in the early 1980's which dealt with visualization to be used for goal setting and actually healing; I've learned Reiki in the last couple years, and have gone on spiritual journeys (i.e., Teotihuacan, Machu Picchu, Lake Titicaca, etc.) One of the most important things I've learned is to be completely present in the moment. It's during those times that one can hear the voice of spirit come through to offer guidance. To me, the more I can connect to Source energy is when I feel the most spiritual.

  6. I've always considered myself as a very spiritual person but not a religious person. I've practiced different types of Yoga over several decades; learned the Silva Method of Mind Control in the early 1980's which dealt with visualization to be used for goal setting and actually healing; I've learned Reiki in the last couple years, and have gone on spiritual journeys (i.e., Teotihuacan, Machu Picchu, Lake Titicaca, etc.) One of the most important things I've learned is to be completely present in the moment. It's during those times that one can hear the voice of spirit come through to offer guidance. To me, the more I can connect to Source energy is when I feel the most spiritual.

  7. Thanks for the comment, Kathy. I was introduced to Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) years ago by a therapist. It changed my life. I'll admit, I have not been as consistent with practicing as I would like, but it's impact on my stress and anxiety, and on my gratitude for life, has been remarkable. Being present in the moment is indescribably powerful. Thank you for sharing your experience!

  8. Thanks for the comment, Kathy. I was introduced to Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) years ago by a therapist. It changed my life. I'll admit, I have not been as consistent with practicing as I would like, but it's impact on my stress and anxiety, and on my gratitude for life, has been remarkable. Being present in the moment is indescribably powerful. Thank you for sharing your experience!

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