Happiness Through Street Food

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Greetings from Manila!

Through both coaching and teaching, one of the basic lessons we convey from the start is around practicing positivity.  In fact, just two week ago I wrote about the Tax Day Positivity and some ideas for practicing activities that bring about positive emotions.

To bring this to life, let me share a real-life example of how I am practicing positivity. 

This week, I am enjoying Filipino culture by exploring Manila and the surrounding areas.  Meeting local people, trying authentic food, and exploring historic places brings me great joy.  And sharing my experiences with others aligns with my higher purpose of “being and sharing the light, freely.”  It is very satisfying when I can bring others along with me as I learn and try new things, and it is very meaningful to actively practice my purpose.  In essence, writing this for you to read is one way that I practice positivity.

Some people call me crazy (even in the last 24 hours) for what I am willing to eat.  I enjoy pushing the limits of foreign cuisine because I know most people will never try the things I eat.  Allowing you to live vicariously through my appetite is fun and interesting to me.  Here are a few things I have tried in the last couple of days and my commentary on the experience:

Spicy Szechuan Chicken Feet I had this for breakfast, believe it or not.  It was very spicy, a little slimy, not much meat, and toes that kept breaking off – although they are soft enough to chew and eat.

Knockout Knuckles – These pork knuckles (the jointed portion of the rear legs) are slow roasted and deep fried.  They were very crunchy, a little dry, and a bit salty.

Isaw – Filipino street food is very popular, and isaw is the crown jewel.  Yes – skewered, marinated chicken intestines are delicious.  It was brushed with a savory sauce, covered with vinegar, and definitely lived up to the hype.

Dinakdakan – Another flavorful street food, this dish is a version of sisig (sour, chopped meat).  The description read:  “grilled pig head/face cut in small cubes, with addition of pork brain, and best served with pork liver.”  It was very rich, salty, and sour.  It’s good “drinking food.”

Balut – This is a very traditional treat, often devoured while drinking, but not for the faint of heart.  This is a fertilized duck embryo that is boiled and eaten out of the shell.  After cracking a small hole on one end, sprinkling some salt on it, and sucking the juice out of the shell, you peel the rest and eat the contents.  If you can get past the sight of it, the taste is quite good!

I’ve got five more days to keep exploring.  If you have recommendations, please send my way!

Much love and gratitude,
-Matt

Isaw

Isaw

 

Knockout Knuckles

Knockout Knuckles

 

Dinakdakan

Dinakdakan

 

Balut

Balut

 

2 thoughts on “Happiness Through Street Food

    • Thanks Kyong! Yes, it’s really not pleasant to look at, but the taste was quite good. Also, I’ve been told that these embryos are incubated for 7-17 days. I think it gets much harder to eat at 17 days as the duck is more formed by then. Definitely an incredible experience for me, and glad I could share it with you.

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